Cycle suspension after lift.

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12AMJKU

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Hope this is the right area to ask this. Quick back ground to the topic. I have a 16 Jeep Wrangler unlimited installed a 2.5 lift last fall. I feel ever once and awhile when road conditions are just right like a nice dip in the road and speed something is either bottoming out or hits something. ‍♂. I was talking to a fella today about it and he asked if I cycled my suspension? [emoji848] what? He proceeds to explain. I of course try and find YouTube videos on said topic cause boy do I like pictures (yay for visual learner) but didn’t find to much on the youtubes. So guys and gals with lifts, did you cycle? Or know anyone who has? Should I do it? Or any jk people might know what’s up? Like “ oh hey you need a bump stop extension” or “yay bro it’s hitting such and such”. And yes I climbed underneath I don’t see anything making contact. I’m running a gobi rack with is pretty damn solid so I don’t think that’s it. TIA.
 

OBJK

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Cycling the suspension is done in a controlled environment so that you can move the suepsion slowly up and down on all 4 corners to see if you have any binding issues or tires coming in contact with body or suspension components. Some suspension upgrades require upgraded bumpstops in addition to their springs, arms, and shocks to prevent contact. Most of the time this is done by a shop using a fork lift because you can get allot of travel/ articulation out of newly upgraded suspensions. You typically can't get enough travel with just jacks and jack stands. If you installed the lift yourself you can take your rig to an offroad shop and have them do your alignment and have them cycle the suspension before. There is typically a cost involved, but it let's you know if any other components need to be added *bumpstops or body trimming* to get you into a no contact situation.
 
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12AMJKU

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Cycling the suspension is done in a controlled environment so that you can move the suepsion slowly up and down on all 4 corners to see if you have any binding issues or tires coming in contact with body or suspension components. Some suspension upgrades require upgraded bumpstops in addition to their springs, arms, and shocks to prevent contact. Most of the time this is done by a shop using a fork lift because you can get allot of travel/ articulation out of newly upgraded suspensions. You typically can't get enough travel with just jacks and jack stands. If you installed the lift yourself you can take your rig to an offroad shop and have them do your alignment and have them cycle the suspension before. There is typically a cost involved, but it let's you know if any other components need to be added *bumpstops or body trimming* to get you into a no contact situation.
Thanks for the info. Unfortunately there are no off road shops of that caliber around me that have a forklift or articulation ramp. I guess I’ll have to find me a big rock and do it myself. [emoji23]‍♂
 
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smritte

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I don't bother "cycling" suspension unless I'm building a long travel system. When I do, its to make sure I didn't miss something and have binding or rubbing due to miscalculation.

What your describing is called bottoming out. Your springs support the vehicle weight and your shocks control the speed the springs compress and expand.
If you change the weight of the vehicle, the tire rim weight/size, the springs have to change with them. The shocks match the springs.

Unfortunately, most lift kits are a "this spring fits all" and "this shock fits all" for a 2"- 4" lift. Based on how many people actually off-road their vehicle, this problem is frequently overlooked. Another issue is, most companies sell springs based on stock vehicle weight, only giving an option for hard or soft top.

Extending bump stops is done to keep the stock items from binding. If your vehicle had 3" of travel, you raised 2", you should have 5" of travel. Unfortunately now when the axle articulates, the angle is greater than it was stock and you have interferance or breakage. You move the Bump Stop up to prevent this and loose most of your travel. Now you bottom out.

So....onto your question. You have a few choices. Go with a stiffer spring and shock (this will effect ride), go slower off road (I cant seem to do this), run it the way it is and just watch what your doing. Remember the key point here, springs support weight. As you add weight, you should go to heavier spring. Match shock to this.

To set up a vehicle properly, it takes more than most places will do. They just order what's available and bolt it on not caring about anything other than just lifting the vehicle. My Landcruiser is lifted 2.5 inches. The springs and shocks are not even close to being correct. I'm waiting until I get done adding things on before I start getting serious about my suspension. I just deal with the bottoming out until then.

Scott
 
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The other Sean

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What method did the lift use?

if you aren't seeing any places of contact, it is possible you are bottoming out a shock. You could try the zip tie on the shock shaft trick to see where your shock travel is.

Also, not being a jeep guy, on coil sprung setups, you can pull the coils and with the shocks attached cycle the suspension from full droop to full compression to see what's going on.
 
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avgjoe624

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who installed the lift? check to make sure that all the bolts are tight, you could be hitting a bump and shifting something held in by a loose bolt, unless your hitting some serious holes in the road, it (shouldn't) by your shocks or bumpstops.

it does sound like your bottoming out. but it should take a lot more than a pot hole to bottom out your jeep with a lift.
 

12AMJKU

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I don't bother "cycling" suspension unless I'm building a long travel system. When I do, its to make sure I didn't miss something and have binding or rubbing due to miscalculation.

What your describing is called bottoming out. Your springs support the vehicle weight and your shocks control the speed the springs compress and expand.
If you change the weight of the vehicle, the tire rim weight/size, the springs have to change with them. The shocks match the springs.

Unfortunately, most lift kits are a "this spring fits all" and "this shock fits all" for a 2"- 4" lift. Based on how many people actually off-road their vehicle, this problem is frequently overlooked. Another issue is, most companies sell springs based on stock vehicle weight, only giving an option for hard or soft top.

Extending bump stops is done to keep the stock items from binding. If your vehicle had 3" of travel, you raised 2", you should have 5" of travel. Unfortunately now when the axle articulates, the angle is greater than it was stock and you have interferance or breakage. You move the Bump Stop up to prevent this and loose most of your travel. Now you bottom out.

So....onto your question. You have a few choices. Go with a stiffer spring and shock (this will effect ride), go slower off road (I cant seem to do this), run it the way it is and just watch what your doing. Remember the key point here, springs support weight. As you add weight, you should go to heavier spring. Match shock to this.

To set up a vehicle properly, it takes more than most places will do. They just order what's available and bolt it on not caring about anything other than just lifting the vehicle. My Landcruiser is lifted 2.5 inches. The springs and shocks are not even close to being correct. I'm waiting until I get done adding things on before I start getting serious about my suspension. I just deal with the bottoming out until then.

Scott
Thanks Scott. I’m actually going to be getting heavy duty springs, over winter I built a galley and I installed it and I’m sagging a bit. (The noise I was and I’m hearing happened before the galley). And the. Upgrade my shocks.
 

12AMJKU

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What method did the lift use?

if you aren't seeing any places of contact, it is possible you are bottoming out a shock. You could try the zip tie on the shock shaft trick to see where your shock travel is.

Also, not being a jeep guy, on coil sprung setups, you can pull the coils and with the shocks attached cycle the suspension from full droop to full compression to see what's going on.
Sorry for my ignorance, what’s the zip tie trick? I’ll just YouTube I’m sure it’s on there lol.
 

12AMJKU

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who installed the lift? check to make sure that all the bolts are tight, you could be hitting a bump and shifting something held in by a loose bolt, unless your hitting some serious holes in the road, it (shouldn't) by your shocks or bumpstops.

it does sound like your bottoming out. but it should take a lot more than a pot hole to bottom out your jeep with a lift.
All bolts are tight I torqued to spec. It’s not a so much as a bump but more like a whoop de do? Hahahah or like mogul for better reference. The roads are bad where I live [emoji23]
 

Jrahn0822

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If all bolts are tight and its doing it on moguls (my roads are that bad too) then I would definitely say you are bottoming out. You will need to upgrade your springs for sure. Shocks will be a smart upgrade too, but not necessarily needed depending on what you have on there now. Not sure what lift you did and what spring rate the shocks are currently, but I'm guessing you'll want to go up at least to the next weight rating if not two.
 
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The other Sean

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Sorry for my ignorance, what’s the zip tie trick? I’ll just YouTube I’m sure it’s on there lol.
You put a zip tie snugly on the center of the shock shaft and then drive around. The shock body will push it as the suspension cycles. where it is after a drive shows you how far the shock compresses. if it is damaged or gone, you are bottoming out your shock and your bump stops need looking at.
 
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smritte

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I’m actually going to be getting heavy duty springs, over winter I built a galley and I installed it and I’m sagging a bit. (The noise I was and I’m hearing happened before the galley).
I set up my cruiser suspension then saw a bunch of cool things I wanted to build. I had guessed what the total weight was going to be and missed it by a bunch. I blame it on the internet. I'm hoping after my side bars are done, that will be it.
Get the vehicle weighed. Total, front and rear. Talk to the spring people. Give them all the numbers including tire size and how much lift you want. If they say they don't need them or don't ask for them, go somewhere else. The biggest issue ordering springs is, the people you buy from don't understand springs, they just sell you what they have.

Get it set up right and you will be very happy.

Scott
 
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MazeVX

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Get you some progressive bump stops, there are plenty of them that don't cost you much and need no welding for installation. It's a necessity for higher speed on rough ground.
 

12AMJKU

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If all bolts are tight and its doing it on moguls (my roads are that bad too) then I would definitely say you are bottoming out. You will need to upgrade your springs for sure. Shocks will be a smart upgrade too, but not necessarily needed depending on what you have on there now. Not sure what lift you did and what spring rate the shocks are currently, but I'm guessing you'll want to go up at least to the next weight rating if not two.
I’m going to be ordering the teraflex outback 2.5 springs which will definitely be an upgrade. Then down the road my plan it to order falcon shocks.
 

12AMJKU

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I set up my cruiser suspension then saw a bunch of cool things I wanted to build. I had guessed what the total weight was going to be and missed it by a bunch. I blame it on the internet. I'm hoping after my side bars are done, that will be it.
Get the vehicle weighed. Total, front and rear. Talk to the spring people. Give them all the numbers including tire size and how much lift you want. If they say they don't need them or don't ask for them, go somewhere else. The biggest issue ordering springs is, the people you buy from don't understand springs, they just sell you what they have.

Get it set up right and you will be very happy.

Scott
That’s one problem around here for sure. Hardly any shops build rigs and if they do it’s more for “show” not function.
 

Jku Ben

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Just a thought see if there any equipment rental companies in your area & see if you can use one of there forklifts on their property ? Just a thought. I installed a 2.5” teraflex lift on my 2017 Jku & have never had any issues & did not cycle my suspension other than dropping axles & reconnecting them after putting new springs. Just a thought good luck.
 
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12AMJKU

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Just a thought see if there any equipment rental companies in your area & see if you can use one of there forklifts on their property ? Just a thought. I installed a 2.5” teraflex lift on my 2017 Jku & have never had any issues & did not cycle my suspension other than dropping axles & reconnecting them after putting new springs. Just a thought good luck.
Great idea. Thanks man.