Chevy vs Ford vs Toyota pickup | OVERLAND BOUND COMMUNITY

Chevy vs Ford vs Toyota pickup

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Contributor I

60
Montréal, Quebec, Canada
First Name
Nicholas
Last Name
Monte
the problem when you ask a question like which brand is better, you will get answers slanted towards that persons preference.
myself, i could care less what nameplate hangs on the hood, i've owned and driven all 3 (gm, ford, dodge)
by far the worst for reliabilty i've seen with my own eyes is ford super duty diesels. my dad's construction company was in business for 42 yrs. From '79 till the late '90's, it was all GM gasser trucks, was not uncommon to see 300 thou with no major probs. then in '98 he got smitten by the SD's torque, went hardcore on ford and bought approx 17 or 18 diesel SD's. the only good engine they used was the Navistar 7.3, the 6.0, 6.4 and 6.7 were strait up garbage.
turbo failures galore, prob a record, five turbo's on 1 truck, HPFR and HPOP failures were every second week. injectors dumping diesel into the crank was another huge prob and ford never could seem to figure how to seal up the oil pump on any of their diesels. pretty bad when we show up at a customers house and have to throw a piece of cardboard under your new truck so it don't stain the customers driveway. and yes, multiple times ford had to take the cab off to work on them which is RIDICULOUS!!!
after close to 20 yrs with ford, he got fed up and bought a 2020 ram 3500 diesel. unfortunately he died 6 months after buying it, so i have no say on it's long term reliabilty
Ford gasser motors don't fare much better in my eyes either, especially when my sister takes her windstar in for normal servicing and gets a $3800 bill after 3 spark plugs snapped off...
my current employer has about 30 trucks, which were split pretty even between ford and gm trucks and a bunch of sprinter vans. as the fleet aged, more probs occurred. the gm's were famous for chucking codes, i don't think a single one didn't have the check engine light on, but they still ran like a raped ape, and the fords-well they were catastrophic failures-like a t-case breaking right down the center of the case on the highway at 60 mph then skidding all over the road trying to come to a stop. and the sprinters were electrical nightmares and we bent the trailing axle on 3 of them very easily.
earlier this yr he got a new fleet of new 1 ton gm's (22 trucks) and some new fiat doblo vans (8). the only ford left in the fleet is a 2019 F450 flatdeck which has had no serious probs yet.
imho if you want LONG TERM reliabilty, sometimes you have to go back in time. in my experience, most truck from the '90's down will prob go further and longer than most new trucks. my '90 gm has 400 thou and the block has NEVER been cracked open. sure, did the valve seals at 200, and an intake gasket, but thats it, which is pretty minor. a gm 350 is just about one of the most bulletproof engines made- hell, there is more non gm vehicles that have a small block swapped in them than all other brands combined. not unusual to find them in fords, chrycos, imports, boats, even planes
and for service and price-tuff to beat a gm. basiclly 2 engines, small and big blocks, with unlimited interchangeability, compare that to a ford or chryco motor, 5, 6, 7 or more blocks with no interchangeability, now imagine the tooling costs to make parts for all those motors. to build a 500 hp chev, if it was to cost $2500, that same 500hp in a ford would be $4000 and a 500hp mopar would be in the 6 grand range.
as far as i'm concerned, the last great reliable motors were chev 5.7's, chryco slant six'ers and ford 351 C's. the new motors don't even compare. would also give honorable mention to the gm 396, it's a monster of a mill.
for the utmost in reliabilty, you can't go wrong with a gm squarebody or an older dodge W truck
So you have no opinion on the Toyota Tundra?
 

DevilDodge

Rank III

Enthusiast III

830
Glasgow, Pennsylvania, USA
First Name
David
Last Name
Spencer
ON 2nd thought, please do not buy a Dodge or RAM. Please, no one buy a Dodge or a RAM. Please...let them sit on lots and tell everyone you see that they should not own one. Tell them this is especially true of the ones that say Powerwagon or power ram or Tradesman or ramcharger.

Tell them it would be in their best interest to ship them to a man who goes by devildodge in Pennsylvania.

He says the worst of them have manual transmissions and have badges like V10 or 6.4l on them. 8 foot beds and crew cabs are especially terrible. Stuff like 440 or 360 are also horrible ideas to buy. Just leave them sit. Tell everyone how terrible they are.
 

rumbledawg

Rank II

Enthusiast II

336
back 40
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dan
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s
So you have no opinion on the Toyota Tundra?
only toyota (actually the only import) i ever owned was a '81 corolla wagon, rwd and a 5 spd. rustier than hell, but ran and ran. paid 500 clams for it, drove it for 2 yrs and sold it for $800
my wife and i were looking at a tacoma for her, but after checking the prices, she decided she wants a Canyon at4
 
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Billiebob

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earth
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I'd also be interested to know which is easier to repair yourself
Think 1960s, 1970s for ease of driveway fixes., maintenance.... there is nothing easily servicable about any new vehicle.

Fords really are built Ford Tough.
Chevies really are built to ride like a Cadillac.
Toyotas are fabulous urban pickups which gives them a marvellous reliability rating.

I'd buy a base Ford, F150 or F250 XL..... with the locking rear dif.
 
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Patman

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Adventure

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These type of threads are always entertaining.
I always answer the same way. Drive them all, buy the one you love. Whatever the reason for your love is, that’s yours. You really have to TRY to buy a bad vehicle now a days. Peoples opinions are based on theirs or someone else’s bad experiences.
Its like customer service. One happy customer generally tells no one. One unhappy customer tells EVERYONE.
Now throw in personal preference, ranging from “I know a guy and his truck is cool” to “my entire family, 6 generations drives brand XXXXX”
I have a deep seated LOVE for all things FIAT. When I grew up in Sweden, my family drove FIATS. My core experiences with cars were based on mid to late 70s, brand new, EURO spec FIATS. Try making that argument in the US with your “average” car guy. I still LOVE them. I have a list of buy sight unseen cars, and that list is almost 80% FIATS of one form or another.
Back to the subject at hand. I have ownership experience with all three brands, and NOTHING, and I mean NOTHING, would make me pick one by the make.
When I bought my Gladiator the deciding factor outside of my Love for all things Jeep, was the offroad capability in stock form. I drove the Ranger, and love the truck, but not the 3 wheel motion for my type of wheeling. I drove the Bison and had the same thoughts. I drove the Taco and while I am a HUGE Toyota fan, just not my cup of tea.
If you have no brand/loyalty/emotional preference, and only buy a vehicle for a tool, make a spreadsheet, enter all the variables, and make an informed decision using whatever metrics are important to your tool’s effectiveness.
Average Overlander (is there such a thing?) the ZR2/AT4 is probably the best box stock midsize truck out there right now, but I don’t drive one because I have no emotional “need” to own one.
My two cents. What’s that with inflation? Like .000000000000000000000002
 

leeloo

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I am curious what the guy who started this will choose. Things are much clear now I think.. :)
 
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DevilDodge

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Glasgow, Pennsylvania, USA
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Don’t mean to disappoint you @DevilDodge but RAM trucks go to the serious off-pavement workers.

Professional crews in construction, utilities, landscaping, hauling, and similar services avoid downtime whenever possible.

I drive from 9 AM until 7:30 PM, Monday thru Friday, for work, so I see numerous work vehicles at dirt work sites along my work routes.
 
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GLOCKer

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I can only speak to the Ford, so bear with me. The Ford Ranger is a beautiful product when you consider that it didn't make it to the North American market until it had done YEARS of sales in Australia, Asia, and Europe. Not only did we get a proven truck (ute) over here with the Ranger, but there were some improvements made to it specifically for the North American market (chiefly the beefed up frame and full steel bumpers). On top of that, the 2.3 EcoBoost is a great motor and is actually fun to drive. That said, there are things that will disappoint.

The North American Ranger doesn't come with the diesel options that the other market get (and they don't get the gas engine). The suspension really does benefit from upgrading the shocks and struts. In fact, in comparison to the aftermarket stuff, I can't believe Ford lets these trucks out of the factory with the FX4 shocks and struts. Garbage! Another issue is the damn 2.3 EcoBoost's alternator location! It's at the very bottom of the motor, and subject to being dunked during creek crossings. I've never had an issue with this after several water crossings, but I know several people that have. One even had a problem after they drove into the creek behind me!

I have a Ranger and I absolutely love it. It's one of those vehicles that I look back at in the parking lot. When I get to drive it, I get excited. I can't wait to get out on more trips in it! It is not perfect, however. But I've learned to live with minor let downs and I've enjoyed the truck immensely!

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MidOH

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Oops! I forgot to add “serious overland adventurers” too. Point is, if they’re popular with “dirt site” workers then it’s logical to believe RAM is ideal for overlanding.

Depends. Ram almost always means Cummins. And it's impossible to sleep in an idling Cummins. Henceforth why some of us slide in camper guys prefer gas in the winter. And Ford is crushing it with gas engines right now.
 

ZRex

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Depends. Ram almost always means Cummins. And it's impossible to sleep in an idling Cummins. Henceforth why some of us slide in camper guys prefer gas in the winter. And Ford is crushing it with gas engines right now.
I actually found it quite soothing sleeping with my ISX15 idling low for the warm summer nights keeping my bunk cool when I was driving trucks over-the-road. I also have slept in my truck with the old 6.5 Detroit idling away. I guess that's just a truck driver thing though.

As far as the brand arguments go, I would suggest that there is a reason Tacoma's and 4Runner's are a dominant player in the overlanding game, but there are reasons for that that may not line up with your ideal truck. I can say that as a mechanic I found myself putting front ends under many more domestic trucks than I ever did Toyotas, or imports in general. Everyone is going to have an ideal truck, and what's ideal to me may not match for you, just like I would have no interest in an Xterra or Frontier because of my experience with Nissan, or that even though I owned and built a 92 Bronco it's unlikely that I would go back with a Ford and even though a crew cab dually Cummins would be my ideal truck for towing my camper, cars, and tractor around I still don't think I would build a Dodge for overlanding. Not to say that Ford, Dodge, Nissan, or anything else are bad vehicles (I'm running a GMC now and wouldn't build a new GM, either) they just don't suit me for what I want.

All that to say, what truck is ideal for you is really hard for us to decide, at the end of the day pick out your favorites, compare the options, find what you like and go drive them all! One is likely to stick with you be it for price, amenities, aesthetics, or what have you, and that's probably the one YOU want!
 

MidOH

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My Cummins likes to go to high idle and back a few times when I start to fall asleep. Sounds like a 747 spooling up to fly to Fiji. Then shakes light a paint shaker for a bit.

I think the first step is to pick trail size and AO.
 
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Contributor I

60
Montréal, Quebec, Canada
First Name
Nicholas
Last Name
Monte
Depends. Ram almost always means Cummins. And it's impossible to sleep in an idling Cummins. Henceforth why some of us slide in camper guys prefer gas in the winter. And Ford is crushing it with gas engines right now.
I actually found it quite soothing sleeping with my ISX15 idling low for the warm summer nights keeping my bunk cool when I was driving trucks over-the-road. I also have slept in my truck with the old 6.5 Detroit idling away. I guess that's just a truck driver thing though.

As far as the brand arguments go, I would suggest that there is a reason Tacoma's and 4Runner's are a dominant player in the overlanding game, but there are reasons for that that may not line up with your ideal truck. I can say that as a mechanic I found myself putting front ends under many more domestic trucks than I ever did Toyotas, or imports in general. Everyone is going to have an ideal truck, and what's ideal to me may not match for you, just like I would have no interest in an Xterra or Frontier because of my experience with Nissan, or that even though I owned and built a 92 Bronco it's unlikely that I would go back with a Ford and even though a crew cab dually Cummins would be my ideal truck for towing my camper, cars, and tractor around I still don't think I would build a Dodge for overlanding. Not to say that Ford, Dodge, Nissan, or anything else are bad vehicles (I'm running a GMC now and wouldn't build a new GM, either) they just don't suit me for what I want.

All that to say, what truck is ideal for you is really hard for us to decide, at the end of the day pick out your favorites, compare the options, find what you like and go drive them all! One is likely to stick with you be it for price, amenities, aesthetics, or what have you, and that's probably the one YOU want!
Thanks Zrex
 
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