Boeing 757 aviation photo (feedback/help/advice wanted please)

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Joey83

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The photos here were taken today (12.01.2019) with my Sony A77 dslr and my old 135mm manual focus lens.

I was at the airport to photograph it as it is a rare plane at my local airport and I don't know when the next 757 will visit.

I used these settings:

Photo 1:
+1 Exposure
Manual focus on camera and lens
f/2.8 aperture
1/500th shutterspeed
ISO-400
Centre focus point
Taken at 3:57 pm

DSC01595 by Joachim Sandven, on Flickr

Photo 2:
+1 Exposure
Manual focus on camera and lens
f/2.8 perture
1/125th shutterspeed
ISO-800
Centre focus point
Taken at 5:36 pm

DSC01743 by Joachim Sandven, on Flickr
 

Mogwai

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To my untrained eye, the second photo is better. But both just look like airplanes, undistinguishable from other commercial jets. And are airplanes part of overlanding?
 

1derer

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I agree the second picture is better not due to picture status or camera control but interest. I'd recommend creating interest in post maybe B&W. If post is not your thing I relent to 1st comment. Its much more difficult to shoot for an audience then what interests yourself.

Airplanes my not be part of overlanding but photography skill building sure can be!
 

TwoRoadsOverland

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I agree with the others. The second picture's composition provides more interest. And yes, airplanes are part of overlanding...until you takeoff ;)
 
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OtherOrb

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Two keys that I've learned over the years (but definitely have not come anywhere close to perfecting) that helps convert technically-great photographs into works of art:

1) Take photos of light, not things. Light creates the interesting patterns, the interesting contrasts, the interesting ideas.
2) Composition and framing make or break a photo.


The first photo doesn't have any key lighting that sparks interest. The second one does.
Neither have wonderful framing but the second one can be reframed.

Someone mentioned post processing. To create works of art, you have to do post processing. It used to be done in a lab, but can now be done on a computer.

First, focus on light:
1) As @1derer said, consider B/W.
A) B/W would enhance contrast (too much blue in the second photo) so the plane pops out of the background.
B) Converting to B/W would enhance the lights on the plane and those reflecting off the wet runway.

2) Consider cropping. There's too much sky and too much ground. The rule of 3rds is only useful if there's something interesting in the thirds or something interesting that crosses the thirds.
A) Crop up to the end of the reflecting lights.
B) Crop down to the top of the tail.
C) Crop off the wing tips, perhaps all the way to the first antishock body.
A crop like that removes all of the distractions and it creates a sense of motion, a sense of anticipation.

I hope you don't mind, I played with your second photo a bit.
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