Anyone else using an Ego power inverter for their fridge? | OVERLAND BOUND COMMUNITY

Anyone else using an Ego power inverter for their fridge?

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Hjstrater

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Contributor I

60
Otsego, MN, USA
First Name
Henry
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Strater
I have been running some power usage tests with an Ego Power+ 150w inverter, hoping to use it in lieu of buying a dedicated solar generator. I am both happy with the results and a bit disappointed at the same time.

I am running an Iceco JP30 off of the Ego Power inverter hooked up to a 7.5ah(420wh) battery. Set at 32F it ran for almost exactly 20 hours, in my 70F ambient basement, partially filled with drinks, with the cover on, without being opened.

I am happy because this will comfortably cover my power needs overnight. I am disappointed though as I have heard some folks can get multiple days off of similar sized Jackery or GoalZero batteries.

The math here does work out, Iceco says their compressor pulls 33w on Eco. 33w x 20 hours x .5 assuming a 50% duty cycle = 330wh. Factor in a 5-10% efficiency loss each time the voltage is converted. Once for DC battery to AC , once again for AC input to run the DC compressor and you get pretty close to 400wh’s.

Still a cheap way to get the run time I need using equipment I already own, but it’s not a Yeti400x replacement that’s for sure.
 

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The Iceco JP30 is a 12v fridge, yes?

You'll tweak more time out of your power source if you wire a simple 12v fused outlet from your battery, instead of converting it to AC via inverter and back and incurring the losses. Iceco JP30 comes with a 12' DC cord.

How do you plan to recharge your battery when on the road, or are you planning on only using it for single nights?
 

Hjstrater

Rank 0

Contributor I

60
Otsego, MN, USA
First Name
Henry
Last Name
Strater
The Iceco JP30 is a 12v fridge, yes?

You'll tweak more time out of your power source if you wire a simple 12v fused outlet from your battery, instead of converting it to AC via inverter and back and incurring the losses. Iceco JP30 comes with a 12' DC cord.

How do you plan to recharge your battery when on the road, or are you planning on only using it for single nights?
Yes, it’s a 12v fridge that can also run off AC. The battery however is 56v so just running a simple circuit off the battery wouldn’t be an option unfortunately, though I hadn’t even thought about it until you mentioned it. I doubt even if used a step down regulator I would see enough of an efficiency improvement to justify tearing into the gear.

As far as recharging I have 3 of these batteries to cycle through and will recharge using a battery charger plugged into the inverter in my truck. I plan on wiring a 12v outlet back to the bed to run the fridge during the day while driving, and charging the battery off the charger. So long as I drive 4-6 hours a day and don’t sit still for more than a day or two this will work. It’s quite limited compared to a true dual battery or solar set up, but worth the $60 I spent on the inverter to use the batteries I own for other purposes. Would not recommend buying Ego batteries specifically for this use.
 

Road

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Member

Advocate III

3,379
On the road in North America
First Name
Road
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Dude
Member #

6589

Yes, it’s a 12v fridge that can also run off AC. The battery however is 56v so just running a simple circuit off the battery wouldn’t be an option unfortunately, though I hadn’t even thought about it until you mentioned it. I doubt even if used a step down regulator I would see enough of an efficiency improvement to justify tearing into the gear.

As far as recharging I have 3 of these batteries to cycle through and will recharge using a battery charger plugged into the inverter in my truck. I plan on wiring a 12v outlet back to the bed to run the fridge during the day while driving, and charging the battery off the charger. So long as I drive 4-6 hours a day and don’t sit still for more than a day or two this will work. It’s quite limited compared to a true dual battery or solar set up, but worth the $60 I spent on the inverter to use the batteries I own for other purposes. Would not recommend buying Ego batteries specifically for this use.
.
Ohh...the batteries are EGO too; cordless power tool batts, I'm assuming. Interesting setup then, and I hope it does what you want without being too inconvenient to keep track of regularly.

You might find you don't have to power the fridge much overnight if it gets and keeps a good chill while driving. Trick is to keep your fridge full as possible and replace whatever you take out with some blue freezer blocks or freezer gel packs. Takes a lot less power to run a compact fridge if there's not a lot of empty space. I keep mine unpowered all the time overnight, even in desert environments.

Good luck man, I'll be interested to see how it works out for you!
.
 

Hjstrater

Rank 0

Contributor I

60
Otsego, MN, USA
First Name
Henry
Last Name
Strater
.
Ohh...the batteries are EGO too; cordless power tool batts, I'm assuming. Interesting setup then, and I hope it does what you want without being too inconvenient to keep track of regularly.

You might find you don't have to power the fridge much overnight if it gets and keeps a good chill while driving. Trick is to keep your fridge full as possible and replace whatever you take out with some blue freezer blocks or freezer gel packs. Takes a lot less power to run a compact fridge if there's not a lot of empty space. I keep mine unpowered all the time overnight, even in desert environments.

Good luck man, I'll be interested to see how it works out for you!
.
Good insight, the fridge is new and while testing it I never filled it more than half full, so I feel like I got to the worst case scenario with 20hrs of run time. Maybe I’ll fill it up and see how long it goes.
 
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Road

Not into ranks, titles or points.
Member

Advocate III

3,379
On the road in North America
First Name
Road
Last Name
Dude
Member #

6589

Good insight, the fridge is new and while testing it I never filled it more than half full, so I feel like I got to the worst case scenario with 20hrs of run time. Maybe I’ll fill it up and see how long it goes.
.
Over the years the easiest way has been--at least for me--to have a small soft-sided cooler next to my 12v fridge. I keep a mess of small blue freezer blocks and pliable freezer gel bags in there.

It makes a great place to keep fresh fruit &veggies and eggs sometimes, too. Whenever I take anything out of the fridge that's not going back in, like something getting cooked right then, I grab freezer bags and blocks from the soft cooler to put in its place. Keeps my fridge full and working less.

Another thing I've found really helpful is to have a thermal layer over the top of everything in the fridge. You can use a double layer of reflectix taped around its edges so it insulates better, or any number of things. I use an old thermal bubble wrap sort of thing meant for freezers, with flat air "cubes" about the size of ice cubes. Then I just fold back whichever half I want to get into, helping preserve the chill in the other half. I keep things I use more on top and in front for easier, quicker, access, too.

Keep your fridge out of direct sun when possible, don't block the fridge's vents, make an insulating jacket for it if it doesn't have one (helps keep it cleaner, too), and your fridge will be much happier and run less.

You can see the soft-sided cooler next to the fridge in the image below:

xv2-n-van_6778-900.jpg
.

Good luck with yours, and post back with how the EGO system is working out.

.
 
Last edited:

Hjstrater

Rank 0

Contributor I

60
Otsego, MN, USA
First Name
Henry
Last Name
Strater
.
Over the years the easiest way has been--at least for me--to have a small soft-sided cooler next to my 12v fridge. I keep a mess of small blue freezer blocks and pliable freezer gel bags in there.

It makes a great place to keep fresh fruit &veggies and eggs sometimes, too. Whenever I take anything out of the fridge that's not going back in, like something getting cooked right then, I grab freezer bags and blocks from the soft cooler to put in its place. Keeps my fridge full and working less.

Another thing I've found really helpful is to have a thermal layer over the top of everything in the fridge. You can use a double layer of reflectix taped around its edges so it insulates better, or any number of things. I use an old thermal bubble wrap sort of thing meant for freezers, with flat air "cubes" about the size of ice cubes. Then I just fold back whichever half I want to get into, helping preserve the chill in the other half. I keep things I use more on top and in front for easier, quicker, access, too.

Keep your fridge out of direct sun when possible, don't block the fridge's vents, make an insulating jacket for it if it doesn't have one (helps keep it cleaner, too), and your fridge will be much happier and run less.

You can see the soft-sided cooler next to the fridge in the image below:

View attachment 196564
.

Good luck with yours, and post back with how the EGO system is working out.

.
More great advice, I appreciate it. I have a near endless supply of freezer gel packs from shipments of medication that I can toss in to take up space.

The fridge has a cover already but will be under the tonneau cover in the bed so out of sunlight, but not exactly climate controlled like the back of your rig.
 
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