Anti Shanty Overland Trailer

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Gstrange

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Traveler III

327
Bowling Green, KY, USA
First Name
Greg
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Strange
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16519

I have been reviewing this trailer on You Tube and wondered if anyone in this group has purchased one yet? What are the pros and cons?
Just wondering.....
 

RickR

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Supporter

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1,354
San Antonio, Texas
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Rick
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R
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looks like it could be very useful. It is nice, but how much do they start at? I gotta bet they are a pretty penny, but it looks good.
 

Gstrange

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Traveler III

327
Bowling Green, KY, USA
First Name
Greg
Last Name
Strange
Member #

16519

It does appear to be a very versatile unit, but I agree with you Rick R, that it is probably very expensive toy. Let me know if you hear anything about these!
 

bvanaski

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Contributor I

60
Mountain View, CA, USA
First Name
Brian
Last Name
Vanaski
I have also been researching off-road trailers and ended up finding escapod and placing an order just yesterday actually. They start at $16,000 and have lots of customizable options that can get you all the way up to $30,000. They have an 11 month lead time currently. And from all the research I think it should be fairly good off road. We have a family of five and the option of the Fourseason rooftop tent seems like we can sleep all five of us no problem.
 
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Gstrange

Rank II
Member

Traveler III

327
Bowling Green, KY, USA
First Name
Greg
Last Name
Strange
Member #

16519

I have also been researching off-road trailers and ended up finding escapod and placing an order just yesterday actually. They start at $16,000 and have lots of customizable options that can get you all the way up to $30,000. They have an 11 month lead time currently. And from all the research I think it should be fairly good off road. We have a family of five and the option of the Fourseason rooftop tent seems like we can sleep all five of us no problem.
Thanks for sharing the unit that you chose! Looks like a great rig for your family!
Stay safe and enjoy the escapod!
 
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RoyB

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972
Boston
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Roy
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Bertalotto
I'd hate to have to lower that roof in a pouring rain or snow storm. Everything inside would get drenched!
 

Gstrange

Rank II
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Traveler III

327
Bowling Green, KY, USA
First Name
Greg
Last Name
Strange
Member #

16519

I'd hate to have to lower that roof in a pouring rain or snow storm. Everything inside would get drenched!
That is an interesting point! On the other hand, it would be the same as taking down a tent in a storm. That is part of the experience, complain at that point and then laugh about it later!
 
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RoyB

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972
Boston
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Roy
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Bertalotto
I've taken down dozens of tents in a storm. Inside never gets wet.
 

FreLardian

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Contributor I

233
Sammamish, WA, USA
First Name
Remco
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Stroeken
Member #

24087

I have also been researching off-road trailers and ended up finding escapod and placing an order just yesterday actually. They start at $16,000 and have lots of customizable options that can get you all the way up to $30,000. They have an 11 month lead time currently. And from all the research I think it should be fairly good off road. We have a family of five and the option of the Fourseason rooftop tent seems like we can sleep all five of us no problem.
Hi Brian, I have an Espapod Topo since May last year. Super happy with it. Let me know if you have any questions. Cheers, Remco
 

RodgerS

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Contributor I

30
Vallejo, CA, USA
First Name
Rodger
Last Name
Schuester
I have put down a deposit on an Antishanty Pro trailer that will be available for me this July. I will visit the factory next month.

I considered a lot of off-road trailers (including the Escapod), Aussie caravan trailers, truck campers, expedition trucks, etc out there.

Be happy to answer any specific questions on my choice. For general questions on the pros and cons their website has quite a bit of information and a good sized gallery of questions worth researching that answered a lot of my questions and concerns.

I will be towing that trailer with my Ford F150 4x4 truck. I have a Decked storage system in the bed of my truck.

The fully loaded mfg. trailer will weigh upwards of 2,500 pounds with a GVWR of about 3,500 pounds.

Mostly I will focus on dispersed and free campsites when traveling for a month. I like people but wish to avoid the typical RV campgrounds.
I have no plans for serious advanced off-roading.

From my point of view, some examples of pros:
Removable hitch, marine grade diesel stove that cooks and heats the cabin, newly available sink and outdoor on-demand shower, low dry tow weight relative to my truck,
very modular, easy to repair and clean, no cheap parts I can identify like pressed wood cabinets you find in a lot of RVs, can stand and get dressed inside in the morning,
Timbren off-road suspension, also great for a couple of guys going hunting or for other outdoor activities, any water invasion will cause minimal or no damage compared to a traditional rv as far as I can tell, designed to take an off-road pounding.

Cons: not mean to impress traditional RV-oriented wives.

Overall: Definitely an outdoor oriented guys oriented trailer. Great to haul toys with. A pay for what you get idea.
 
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Gstrange

Rank II
Member

Traveler III

327
Bowling Green, KY, USA
First Name
Greg
Last Name
Strange
Member #

16519

I have put down a deposit on an Antishanty Pro trailer that will be available for me this July. I will visit the factory next month.

I considered a lot of off-road trailers (including the Escapod), Aussie caravan trailers, truck campers, expedition trucks, etc out there.

Be happy to answer any specific questions on my choice. For general questions on the pros and cons their website has quite a bit of information and a good sized gallery of questions worth researching that answered a lot of my questions and concerns.

I will be towing that trailer with my Ford F150 4x4 truck. I have a Decked storage system in the bed of my truck.

The fully loaded mfg. trailer will weigh upwards of 2,500 pounds with a GVWR of about 3,500 pounds.

Mostly I will focus on dispersed and free campsites when traveling for a month. I like people but wish to avoid the typical RV campgrounds.
I have no plans for serious advanced off-roading.

From my point of view, some examples of pros:
Removable hitch, marine grade diesel stove that cooks and heats the cabin, newly available sink and outdoor on-demand shower, low dry tow weight relative to my truck,
very modular, easy to repair and clean, no cheap parts I can identify like pressed wood cabinets you find in a lot of RVs, can stand and get dressed inside in the morning,
Timbren off-road suspension, also great for a couple of guys going hunting or for other outdoor activities, any water invasion will cause minimal or no damage compared to a traditional rv as far as I can tell, designed to take an off-road pounding.

Cons: not mean to impress traditional RV-oriented wives.

Overall: Definitely an outdoor oriented guys oriented trailer. Great to haul toys with. A pay for what you get idea.
RodgerS,
Thanks for your input! I look forward to hearing from you in the near future when you have had it on the trail for a couple of months. I like hearing what new owners think of their rigs. Both the pros and cons! When you can, throw a few photos in too.
 

RodgerS

Rank 0

Contributor I

30
Vallejo, CA, USA
First Name
Rodger
Last Name
Schuester
I spent some time looking over the Escapod website. It looks like a very strong and well-designed unit for going off-road and the base price seems fair. So I would agree on first blush its a solid choice in its category. I think it has some sweetheart friendly design features the Antishanty is light on, like a nice outdoor kitchen and interior cabinets.

There were many issues that led me to the Antishanty, one of which standing room being a key factor and adaptability being another. Senior citizens, like myself, have considerations just not that understandable until you get to my age group.

On a different website someone seemed to feel the Antishanty was too complex and was concerned the stove might be electric. Seems to me the designers actually avoided complexity and the stove is a marine grade diesel unit that also doubles as a heater. For example, they just reconfigured the air conditioner unit to an easily replaceable and repairable unit mounted on the side from Home Depot they just slot into an outside protected watertight casing, with two hours running time on the current battery system. A/C is one of the toughest issues for any trailer due to power usage and repair issues. The Antishanty runs on two lithium batteries with a solar system.

Next month I plan to visit the AntiShanty factory and will upload my impressions thereafter and some pictures.
 
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Gstrange

Rank II
Member

Traveler III

327
Bowling Green, KY, USA
First Name
Greg
Last Name
Strange
Member #

16519

I spent some time looking over the Escapod website. It looks like a very strong and well-designed unit for going off-road and the base price seems fair. So I would agree on first blush its a solid choice in its category. I think it has some sweetheart friendly design features the Antishanty is light on, like a nice outdoor kitchen and interior cabinets.

There were many issues that led me to the Antishanty, one of which standing room being a key factor and adaptability being another. Senior citizens, like myself, have considerations just not that understandable until you get to my age group.

On a different website someone seemed to feel the Antishanty was too complex and was concerned the stove might be electric. Seems to me the designers actually avoided complexity and the stove is a marine grade diesel unit that also doubles as a heater. For example, they just reconfigured the air conditioner unit to an easily replaceable and repairable unit mounted on the side from Home Depot they just slot into an outside protected watertight casing, with two hours running time on the current battery system. A/C is one of the toughest issues for any trailer due to power usage and repair issues. The Antishanty runs on two lithium batteries with a solar system.

Next month I plan to visit the AntiShanty factory and will upload my impressions thereafter and some pictures.
RodgerS,
I can't wait to hear from you after your visit to the factory for AntiShanty!
I have been looking at their design and appreciate the simplicity of the interior features. I had another offroad trailer that had onboard water and water heater. I never had any trouble with the system but the on demand hot water heater unit was winterized, I thought, yet it had a little water in an elbow joint that froze one year. With the AntiShanty, one wouldn't have to worry about water freezing. Now I see they have installed a 30 gallon water tank and water heater. More weight and headaches I think.
 

RodgerS

Rank 0

Contributor I

30
Vallejo, CA, USA
First Name
Rodger
Last Name
Schuester
RodgerS,
I can't wait to hear from you after your visit to the factory for AntiShanty!
I have been looking at their design and appreciate the simplicity of the interior features. I had another offroad trailer that had onboard water and water heater. I never had any trouble with the system but the on demand hot water heater unit was winterized, I thought, yet it had a little water in an elbow joint that froze one year. With the AntiShanty, one wouldn't have to worry about water freezing. Now I see they have installed a 30 gallon water tank and water heater. More weight and headaches I think.
I will be sure to mention winterizing concerns and your example of a design failure. I will reread this thread before I go.

Their first interior A/C unit didn't work well enough so they moved to the unit I mentioned previously. I know about that because they are very transparent on the phone which says a lot about them. Unlike a lot of trailer builders these four guys actually take these units out and live in them. They are also well experienced as off-roaders, campers, trailer builders, and designers.

They are also installing a sink with a shower and on demand hot water unit. To me it is not a complexity issue but a feature issue. Fortunately they have three trailer options and the ability to add or replace features one might want further down the line...the trailer is really adaptable in its design compared to just about any other trailer one can think about. And they didn't just adapt a current cargo trailer. This was an up from the bottom design. The pro unit compared to the basic has a huge storage section in the front where they store the diesel for the stove and the electrics.

Actually, water storage was an issue for me, so to some extent this new feature makes sense. They do have to watch the weight because the pro unit fully loaded before water storage is around 2,500 lbs and the GVWR is 3,500 lbs. The GVWR is not listed on their specs, I had to ask. The trailer needs to be able to haul a toy, so the more important one wants to add weight the more one is encouraged to move towards the basic unit as I see it. Myself, I don't plan on carrying any toys except for my dog.

Carrying a couple of water containers in my truck was my first idea. As I recall my dry weight compared to GVWR in the truck allows me about 1,500 lbs. My dog alone weighs 95 pounds and the wife a little more. My towing weight after subtracting the truck is around 6,000 pounds.

I do plan 4 to 6 week trips in the trailer, another reason for bypassing a typical teardrop.

There are the pain and headaches with and without certain features.
 
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Gstrange

Rank II
Member

Traveler III

327
Bowling Green, KY, USA
First Name
Greg
Last Name
Strange
Member #

16519

I will be sure to mention winterizing concerns and your example of a design failure. I will reread this thread before I go.

Their first interior A/C unit didn't work well enough so they moved to the unit I mentioned previously. I know about that because they are very transparent on the phone which says a lot about them. Unlike a lot of trailer builders these four guys actually take these units out and live in them. They are also well experienced as off-roaders, campers, trailer builders, and designers.

They are also installing a sink with a shower and on demand hot water unit. To me it is not a complexity issue but a feature issue. Fortunately they have three trailer options and the ability to add or replace features one might want further down the line...the trailer is really adaptable in its design compared to just about any other trailer one can think about. And they didn't just adapt a current cargo trailer. This was an up from the bottom design. The pro unit compared to the basic has a huge storage section in the front where they store the diesel for the stove and the electrics.

Actually, water storage was an issue for me, so to some extent this new feature makes sense. They do have to watch the weight because the pro unit fully loaded before water storage is around 2,500 lbs and the GVWR is 3,500 lbs. The GVWR is not listed on their specs, I had to ask. The trailer needs to be able to haul a toy, so the more important one wants to add weight the more one is encouraged to move towards the basic unit as I see it. Myself, I don't plan on carrying any toys except for my dog.

Carrying a couple of water containers in my truck was my first idea. As I recall my dry weight compared to GVWR in the truck allows me about 1,500 lbs. My dog alone weighs 95 pounds and the wife a little more. My towing weight after subtracting the truck is around 6,000 pounds.

I do plan 4 to 6 week trips in the trailer, another reason for bypassing a typical teardrop.

There are the pain and headaches with and without certain features.
You bring up sound thoughts and judgement on what you need. I too, love creature comforts. When traveling, I want to enjoy the time and not be repairing something on the camper. Again, I will enjoy your reply when you get to view the factory. Some day I hope to do the same.
All the best and happy trails!
 

Contributor I

30
Granada, España
First Name
Alex
Last Name
Shumalov
Ham Callsign
Zooperi
I will be sure to mention winterizing concerns and your example of a design failure. I will reread this thread before I go.

Their first interior A/C unit didn't work well enough so they moved to the unit I mentioned previously. I know about that because they are very transparent on the phone which says a lot about them. Unlike a lot of trailer builders these four guys actually take these units out and live in them. They are also well experienced as off-roaders, campers, trailer builders, and designers.

They are also installing a sink with a shower and on demand hot water unit. To me it is not a complexity issue but a feature issue. Fortunately they have three trailer options and the ability to add or replace features one might want further down the line...the trailer is really adaptable in its design compared to just about any other trailer one can think about. And they didn't just adapt a current cargo trailer. This was an up from the bottom design. The pro unit compared to the basic has a huge storage section in the front where they store the diesel for the stove and the electrics.

Actually, water storage was an issue for me, so to some extent this new feature makes sense. They do have to watch the weight because the pro unit fully loaded before water storage is around 2,500 lbs and the GVWR is 3,500 lbs. The GVWR is not listed on their specs, I had to ask. The trailer needs to be able to haul a toy, so the more important one wants to add weight the more one is encouraged to move towards the basic unit as I see it. Myself, I don't plan on carrying any toys except for my dog.

Carrying a couple of water containers in my truck was my first idea. As I recall my dry weight compared to GVWR in the truck allows me about 1,500 lbs. My dog alone weighs 95 pounds and the wife a little more. My towing weight after subtracting the truck is around 6,000 pounds.

I do plan 4 to 6 week trips in the trailer, another reason for bypassing a typical teardrop.

There are the pain and headaches with and without certain features.
Yes, there were air conditioning problems and a lot of people complained about it. Of course, it is not pleasant when this happens on a trip. Everything must be carefully checked and prepared before leaving.

About 2 weeks before leaving, you need to drive a couple of miles in your van, RV, or truck per day. At the same time, turning on all basic devices and functions.
I have become so accustomed to doing it and I have never been let down by it on my trips.

By the way, speaking of air conditioning and cooling in general, there are portable swamp coolers (evaporative coolers) that use little resources for cooling and are very effective in dry climates or when the sun in zenith. I read an informative article about this and now I think what it's better to buy: portable A/C, fan or evaporative cooler.
 

Gstrange

Rank II
Member

Traveler III

327
Bowling Green, KY, USA
First Name
Greg
Last Name
Strange
Member #

16519

Yes, there were air conditioning problems and a lot of people complained about it. Of course, it is not pleasant when this happens on a trip. Everything must be carefully checked and prepared before leaving.

About 2 weeks before leaving, you need to drive a couple of miles in your van, RV, or truck per day. At the same time, turning on all basic devices and functions.
I have become so accustomed to doing it and I have never been let down by it on my trips.

By the way, speaking of air conditioning and cooling in general, there are portable swamp coolers (evaporative coolers) that use little resources for cooling and are very effective in dry climates or when the sun in zenith. I read an informative article about this and now I think what it's better to buy: portable A/C, fan or evaporative cooler.
I have personally lived in homes with swamp coolers and had a love hate relationship. They work great in areas with low humidity, but also cause anything that is a paper product to curl or warp. I believe it would be a nice solution for short term, but long term not so much.
 

RodgerS

Rank 0

Contributor I

30
Vallejo, CA, USA
First Name
Rodger
Last Name
Schuester
Thought I should mention I have made a directional change. I start my Gyroplane training next week.
I plan to allocate the money I had set aside for an AntiShanty towards a Autogyro Calidus Gyroplane.
Obviously this says nothing useful about the AntiShanty, but is simply a whole different direction.
Cheers.