Airing down tires (pressure valves)

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MOAK

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I don't understand the whole time saving thing. The idea of getting out there is to relax, and enjoy the beauty of out lands. A few minutes to air down will not matter to me.
A good air chuck will do fine. Deflates to within .5psi. I've had this on for a few decades, half the cost and can air up the tire too.
Zim
View attachment 217392
Spend $9.99 and have this in the tool bag. If you tear off a valve stem you'll need this to pull a new one through the hole unless you're really really good with a set of dikes. LOL
View attachment 217394
Agreed 100%- Sad that folks bring with them the very things they are attempting to take a vacation from.
 

MidOH

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I don't understand the whole time saving thing. The idea of getting out there is to relax, and enjoy the beauty of out lands. A few minutes to air down will not matter to me.
A good air chuck will do fine. Deflates to within .5psi. I've had this on for a few decades, half the cost and can air up the tire too.
Zim
View attachment 217392
Spend $9.99 and have this in the tool bag. If you tear off a valve stem you'll need this to pull a new one through the hole unless you're really really good with a set of dikes. LOL
View attachment 217394

You cant relax if your back is aching from crappy tools.

Rubber stems and simple guages arent meant for airing up or down every weekend. Takes too long, and those tools are too fussy.

These dedicated valves, and a dual inflation whip are priceless. Drilling a hole in an Al wheel is easy.

If cost is an issue, skip the BS snorkel and Rotopacks.
 

Truckee

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@Wranglervirus I've not used these but I have used many deflation devices (there are a lot of them) and the best I've used is the Powertank Monster Valves and they've been out for many years. Yes, they deflate way faster than pulling the valve stem... no special tools too. They usually install in addition to your regular valve stem and so there is no back and forth checking for pressure. Those who haven't tried it... just don't know. I understand everyone has different tire sizes and terrain. I sometimes air up and air down 2-3 times in a day. I mean, I can stay aired down but it is 20-30 miles of road between trails. Do I want to stay aired down? It really tears up my tires to stay aired down.
 

bgenlvtex

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@Wranglervirus I've not used these but I have used many deflation devices (there are a lot of them) and the best I've used is the Powertank Monster Valves and they've been out for many years. Yes, they deflate way faster than pulling the valve stem... no special tools too. They usually install in addition to your regular valve stem and so there is no back and forth checking for pressure. Those who haven't tried it... just don't know. I understand everyone has different tire sizes and terrain. I sometimes air up and air down 2-3 times in a day. I mean, I can stay aired down but it is 20-30 miles of road between trails. Do I want to stay aired down? It really tears up my tires to stay aired down.
I'll take a hard pass on a $200 set of valves that require drilling and tapping a secondary valve cut.
 

North American Sojourner

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We really should have a competition for all these types of things. Whoever gets to the trail head first, airs down first, gets to camp, sets up, eats, gets a shower, breaks down & packs up camp, back to trail head, airs up and gets home first wins!! LOL
I'm game. I'm making a video tomorrow. Will be fun.
LMAO
Zim
 
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North American Sojourner

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A lot of TPMS valve stems are aluminum nowadays… they won’t last like brass.
Oh no. You did not go there...lmao. The world is about to crash.
Seriously if you destroy this valve on a rock, you're in deep kimchi.
Zim

These are some questions we all need to ask ourselves.
Repair on a 36* slope will challenge your resolve whether or not you are breaking a bead or mounting a spare. Can you use your rig to break a bead or do you have spoon or bead hammer?
Do ya have a spare service kit for a TPMS valve or do ya need one?
Is there a difference between a P series tire valve stem, and a LT valve stem? (6/8/10/12ply) Oh yeah there is.
This is where we teach folks, not make fun of their gear.

Thank you sir for the great point.
Zim
 
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Truckee

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Your sarcasm has gone wasted.

I have aluminum TPMS valve stems on my road vehicles. I check and fill the tires every now and then. With normal use, the valve stems already get tore up from any kind of air chuck... clip on, screw on and or just push-to-fill. How will the internal threads hold up to constantly unscrewing/ screwing the valve cores. It's going to get stripped in short time.

I just had new tires installed with a new TPMS service kit and the valve stem came back oblong. The one it replaced had a little chunk missing . Probably installers fault but it shouldn't be that easy to damage.

Typical Tacoma aluminum valve stem is the same as used on the Corolla.
 

North American Sojourner

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Your sarcasm has gone wasted.

I have aluminum TPMS valve stems on my road vehicles. I check and fill the tires every now and then. With normal use, the valve stems already get tore up from any kind of air chuck... clip on, screw on and or just push-to-fill. How will the internal threads hold up to constantly unscrewing/ screwing the valve cores. It's going to get stripped in short time.

I just had new tires installed with a new TPMS service kit and the valve stem came back oblong. The one it replaced had a little chunk missing . Probably installers fault but it shouldn't be that easy to damage.

Typical Tacoma aluminum valve stem is the same as used on the Corolla.
Hey I tried LOL. I've installed thousands of valve stems and service kits over the years. Tomorrow I'm headed over to my buddy's shop opened in 1918. (yeah we've both done model A tires...LOL) I really just wanted to draw attention to the fact this is a relaxing and peaceful thing of going into the back country. I support any industry that wants to provide equipment to it. I also support anyone that has the resources to purchase and use theses valves. I also consider it my responsibility to advise to be prepared when shit goes south. LMAO
Zim
IMG-1379.JPG
 
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Truckee

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As of 2017 chevrolet colorados still have brass stems and scrader valves.
Chevy did it right!

@Zim I'm with you on enjoying and relaxing the back country. But we aren't all retired and often only have a weekend to get away. Sometimes we have to rush to make camp before sunset... or rendezvous with others at a certain time and place. Airing down/up is neither off-road nor on-road, it's in transition... so why waste time there. Sure, we could use the time to look over the mechanicals but you can't really get focused on your mechanicals if your mind is concerned about over-deflating your tires. Yes, those Staun type deflators are nice in that regard (deficient in others). I'll just say to people, don't knock it until you try it. It's nice to get to your target pressure in 30 seconds (per tire) and be done with it.

The Monster Valves are expensive but there are much cheaper versions including the OP's... and some for even less. Some use the existing valve stem hole.
 

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@Wranglervirus I've not used these but I have used many deflation devices (there are a lot of them) and the best I've used is the Powertank Monster Valves and they've been out for many years. Yes, they deflate way faster than pulling the valve stem... no special tools too. They usually install in addition to your regular valve stem and so there is no back and forth checking for pressure. Those who haven't tried it... just don't know. I understand everyone has different tire sizes and terrain. I sometimes air up and air down 2-3 times in a day. I mean, I can stay aired down but it is 20-30 miles of road between trails. Do I want to stay aired down? It really tears up my tires to stay aired down.
I'll take a hard pass on a $200 set of valves that require drilling and tapping a secondary valve cut.
They do not need any drilling, it gies to factory whole, me paid les than 200; but i would rather spend extra time chating with budies while they are airing down
 

Wranglervirus

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@Wranglervirus I've not used these but I have used many deflation devices (there are a lot of them) and the best I've used is the Powertank Monster Valves and they've been out for many years. Yes, they deflate way faster than pulling the valve stem... no special tools too. They usually install in addition to your regular valve stem and so there is no back and forth checking for pressure. Those who haven't tried it... just don't know. I understand everyone has different tire sizes and terrain. I sometimes air up and air down 2-3 times in a day. I mean, I can stay aired down but it is 20-30 miles of road between trails. Do I want to stay aired down? It really tears up my tires to stay aired down.

And also there is option never air down, somepeople do it and if they only go off the road 1-2 a year is fine, but if it is every week or even few times a week driving without airing down tears susoention mich faster and so my desition is to invest in ir deflators and spend few minutes airing up/down but keeping life of all suspention bushings ect to work much longer
 
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KonzaLander

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I had no idea such a product existed. It is a very interesting concept that I am sure works quiet well. I see the Apex valves require a special air chuck; are they a schrader valve design?

I don't understand the whole time saving thing. The idea of getting out there is to relax, and enjoy the beauty of out lands. A few minutes to air down will not matter to me.
A good air chuck will do fine. Deflates to within .5psi. I've had this on for a few decades, half the cost and can air up the tire too.
Zim
View attachment 217392
Spend $9.99 and have this in the tool bag. If you tear off a valve stem you'll need this to pull a new one through the hole unless you're really really good with a set of dikes. LOL
View attachment 217394
The Blue Point (Snap-on) deflator you have costs $183.50 (today) which is more than the Apex valves @Wranglervirus purchased.

I have used 4 methods to air down over the past 20 years.
  1. #2 phillips screwdriver, simply pressing down the pin on valve core worked but was very slow.
  2. Generic valve core remover, I lost too many valve cores doing this and never could get the air pressure dialed in efficiently.
  3. Staun deflators (brass deflator), I had one deflator that would either dump too much air or not enough despite being reset numerous times.
  4. ARB valve core deflator, this is my current solution. It works by removing the valve core and keeping it captive for quick reinstallation and the gauge is built into the unit.
Having ripped two rubber valve stems off of wheels while on the trail, I know it is a real possibility and very frustrating. I now carry Colby Valve emergency valves in the tool kit. If I tear off a rubber valve stem, I can simply push the remaining part of the valve stem into the wheel, install a Colby Valve and run the Colby Valve for the duration of the trip without needing to break the bead. When I return home I can then break the bead and install a new valve stem.
 

North American Sojourner

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The Blue Point (Snap-on) deflator you have costs $183.50 (today) which is more than the Apex valves @Wranglervirus purchased.
snap.png
Tomorrow I'm going to help Adam clean this up and he's doing my brakes. Decent trade for a change..
Zim
 

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MOAK

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I had no idea such a product existed. It is a very interesting concept that I am sure works quiet well. I see the Apex valves require a special air chuck; are they a schrader valve design?


The Blue Point (Snap-on) deflator you have costs $183.50 (today) which is more than the Apex valves @Wranglervirus purchased.

I have used 4 methods to air down over the past 20 years.
  1. #2 phillips screwdriver, simply pressing down the pin on valve core worked but was very slow.
  2. Generic valve core remover, I lost too many valve cores doing this and never could get the air pressure dialed in efficiently.
  3. Staun deflators (brass deflator), I had one deflator that would either dump too much air or not enough despite being reset numerous times.
  4. ARB valve core deflator, this is my current solution. It works by removing the valve core and keeping it captive for quick reinstallation and the gauge is built into the unit.
Having ripped two rubber valve stems off of wheels while on the trail, I know it is a real possibility and very frustrating. I now carry Colby Valve emergency valves in the tool kit. If I tear off a rubber valve stem, I can simply push the remaining part of the valve stem into the wheel, install a Colby Valve and run the Colby Valve for the duration of the trip without needing to break the bead. When I return home I can then break the bead and install a new valve stem.
I’m right with ya. The ARB deflator was a gift from OJ and it is a game changer… Ripped a stem right off one year and have carried the Colbys since.